50 Books Challenge: The Best of 2013

Once again I did it. I completed the 50th Books Challenge in 2013 with over 50 that I read cover to cover – plus a bunch of books that I started or read partly.

Quite a number of books on my list are nonfictional or text-books. This year, I read an enormous amount of fitness related guides, especially for running. One of my favorites this year deals with the topic of  natural running, ultra-running, paleo background on running, etc. etc. – in short, the definite story about a truly human feature:

Born to Run – Christopher McDougall

 

Every year, I read at least  one book with a large volume of pages. this year it was the fictional lifetime story of  The Aztec – Gary Jennings

It tells the life of an aztec from his birth, through his life as child, warrior, writer, merchant, chronist of the aztec empire’s fall etc. etc.  It’s worth a read for all that want to learn about the aztec culture or those that like historic tales – this time, from a non-european perspective. I was occupied with this book from March until the end of the year. On one hand because I read several other books in parallel and due to the sheer volume of the book (the lines are crammed and the font is small).

 

What Einstein Told his Cook- Robert L. Wolke

I read a bunch of books about chemical background on cooking and food. This one was one of the best because it is as entertaining as detailed and accurate, although not too technical to still understand it without deep knowledge of “hard-core chemistry”.

 

 

I am looking forward into a new 50 book challenge in 2014! Are you in for the challenge?


Primer on Architecture in New York City

Skyline (seen from top of Rockefeller Center)

Skyline (seen from top of Rockefeller Center)

This post was started after my trip to New York. Being in the city that never sleeps was accompanied by a feeling of “been here before”. visiting New York felt like seeing a city that I knew from TV, movies, magazines, books, photographs … actually being in New York – it came as no surprise that there was no surprise at all – just, seen it before. Mostly because of iconic buildings that make up the shape of the city. Famous for skyscrapers and iconic structures. With this blog post, I’d like to show a few of the buildings. For those into architecture nothing new, for the others a recap.

 

Brooklyn Bridge 1869 – 1883

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge

The bridge was the first of it’s kind. Build with concrete and – new at that time – steel. The architect was the German. When he died. Dedicated to the last. Yes, German engineering rocks! :-)

Unfortunate event at the opening was a mass panic. Pedestrians crossed the bridge.

Nowadays, the Brooklyn Bridge is one of the iconic structures in New York. Featured in TV series’ and hollywood movies.

Flatiron Building 1902
Known because it was depicted on lots of postcards.

Flatiron Building

Flatiron Building

Woolworth Building 1910-1913

Woolworth Building

Woolworth Building

Chrysler Building 1928-1930

Crysler Building

Crysler Building

But when it was completed, it didn’t stay long the highest building …

Empire State Building 1929-1931

THE skyscraper in New York was long the highest building in the city and the world.IMG_0780
Rockefeller Center 1931-1940

Built in the time of recession, with the vision of Rockefeller. Used for broadcasting.

PanAm Building 1960-1963
Yes, I keep calling it PanAm Building. Because that was the original name. Walter Gropius. Famous BAUHAUS architecure.

Guggenheim Museum

Guggenheim

Guggenheim

New York Times Building

New York Times Building

times

Hearst Tower

Hearst Tower

Hearst Tower

FRANK  GEHRY

Frank Gehry

Frank Gehry

Four Times Square aka Condé Nast Building

One Bryant Park aka Bank of America
Bank of America

The future:

WTC1 aka Freedomtower

new WTC

new WTC


50 Books Challenge: The Best of 2012

Steve Jobs Biography

As much as I hate Steve Jobs, as interesting was is to read his official biography.

Guy Kawasaki – The Apple Way

Motivational, inspiring, historically interesting!

Superfreakonomics – Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner

This is the second part of the every-day economic lessons. The authors give simple and comprehensible explanations of economic terms/effects derived from funny facts found in statistics and research. I should start an own blog entry just about this book …

When I realised that I was half-way through with Superfreakonomics, I thought that I have to “save up” the remaining chapters instead of inhaling them like summer-morning-air. To conclude, I enjoyed the book very much! :-)

The Agony and the Ecstasy – Irving Stone, already in my personal category for medium to heavy books (more than 600 pages). However, I was able to read it in a comparably short period of time because it is enchanting, although, the genius of Michelangelo can be called “grumpy”. My favorite part is Michelangelo facing pope Sixtus II in fierce. I am not sure how much is true or fiction. Of course Michelangelo met Leonardo and Rafael. But what about the stories from his youth? Or the surgery/ anatomical investigations that he did in a morgue or the confrontations with the pope?

Nonetheless, the book tied me reading for hours on my sofa – a biographical novel worth reading.

Die Vermessung der Welt – Daniel Kehlmann

Also a biographical novel. The lives of the mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss and the scientist Alexander von Humboldt. Intriguing, some myths, but same as Michelangelo: There is always a potion of historic facts inside it. A quick read, but nonetheless entertaining and partly educational about a few historic facts – and historic pitfalls like Neptunism (obsolete theory that earths geology was formed by ancient oceans). For my taste the book is a bit too short and too flimsy about the science/math behind what is going on with the main characters. The Gauss distribution is mentioned but never explained. Anyway, it is a good read after all and I can recommend it.

Some more books from this years reading list that I can recommend:

#08 11 Geheimnisse des IKEA-Erfolgs – Rüdiger Jungbluth
#09 Die PUMA Story – Rolf-Herbert Peters
#32 Pizza Globale – Paul Trummer
#44 Die letzte Generation – Arthur C. Clark

I am looking forward into a new 50 book challenge in 2013! Are you in for the challenge?


2012 is not the end – It is the beginning of a new baktuun

Maya Pyramid of Uxmal

Maya Pyramid of Uxmal

2012 has been predicted to be the end of the world because the Maya calendar is supposed to end
– Ah well, the maya calendar … Which Maya Calendar? The Mayans had several calendar cycles. The tzolk’in is the spiritual cycle consisting of 260 days and there is an agricultural cycle called haab, consisting of 365 days. You might say: “My calendar ends every year. After that, I buy a new one for the following year.”

Indeed our Gregorian calendar is a cycle of 365 days divided into 12 months. And after that, we count the days of the year again. Basically, it is the same with the Mayan calendar. However, the numeric system of the Maya is vegisimal, meaning that it is based on 20.

The calendar elements of the mayans are:

Kin = 1 day
Uinal = 20 days
Tun = 360 days

A “Tun” would be roughly a year (like haab). But there are more measuring elements. The Maya also counted cycles of 20 and 400 years:

Katun = 7,200 days (20 years)
Baktuun = 144,000 days (400 years)

They use these measurements in their third calendar cycle: the long count

This long count uses the combination of days in the ritual and agricultural calendar plus the Katun and Baktuun (because the spiritual and agricultural calendar coincident every 52 years – so you also count the Katun and Baktuun).

The Maya calendar enters the 13th Baktuun on December 21st 2012. It is merely the beginning of a new Baktuun – not the end of the calendar.

The calendar cycles begin again. Of course the Mayans have a prophecy what happens this year, however, is is not related to the end of the world. Mayans even have prophecies for dates that belong another 2000 years into the future. And what do they tell us? The world will still be there.

A good article about the Maya calendar and debunking the myth about the end of the world in 2012 can be found in the German National Geographic Magazine. The illustration of the calendar cycles is excellent.

Parts of the Maya calendar in the Codex Dresdensis can be reviewed online.


50 Books Challenge 2012 – The Biographies

My “50 books challenge” of this year included already a couple of biographies. The autobiography of Richard Branson (#23), collected stories from the CEOs of Puma (#09), a book on IKEA that can be considered as biography of Ingvar Kamprad (#08), and the authorized biography of Steve Jobs (#07).

Biography of Steve Jobs

Biography of Steve Jobs

Although I am not fond of Steve Jobs, I read his biography. It is impressive how many terms and paraphrases were used by the author Steven Isaacson to avoid saying that Steve Jobs was an asshole. How many ways are there to say that a person lacks social skills? Maybe Isaacson did it to prepare the stage for one of my favourite quotes from the book. In one of the last chapters, Steve Jobs says directly that he is an asshole! According to him it is no secret. Well, how true!But talking about the book itself, you recognise by the enthusiastic tone which chapters were written under the influence of interviews with Jobs himself. The sections based on interviews clearly show effects of the “Reality Distortion Field”.

On the other hand, the “Reality Distortion Field” is a good example for Jobs social skills. He used it as a propeller for innovation and as a motivator for tremendous breakthroughs in technology. His passion for perfection and his intrigue product presentations are factors for the success of Apple.

Jobs was an ambigious person. There are attempts for critical thoughts in his biography.

It was a good read after all.

Stay hungry! Stay foolish!

A little sidemark for readers of the German version. The second edition still contains translation errors …

#07 – Authorisierte Biographie von Steve Jobs – Steven Isaacson, Bertelsmann
#08 – Die 11 Geheimnisse des IKEA-Erfolgs – Rüdiger Jungbluth , Campus Verlag
#09 – Die PUMA Story – Rolf-Herbert Peters, Carl Hanser Verlag
#23 – Business ist wie Rock’n’Roll – Richard Branson, Campus Verlag


Eintausendfünfhundert Quadratkilometer Beton und Stahl

Aussicht von meinem Zimmer - Irgendwo links am Horizont versteckt sich das Stadtzentrum unter der Smogglocke

Aussicht von meinem Zimmer - Irgendwo links am Horizont versteckt sich das Stadtzentrum unter der Smogglocke

Auf Wiedersehen an die zweitgrößte Stadt der Welt.
Auf Wiedersehen an ein halbes Jahr voller Abenteuer.
Auf Wiedersehen (hoffentlich nicht!) an die mexikanische Arbeitswelt.
Auf Wiedersehen an die überfüllte, vollgeschwitze Metro.
Auf Wiedersehen an wilde Fahrten in Mikrobussen, Straßentaxis, Überlandbussen etc.
Auf Wiedersehen an die Taco-Stände die man an vielen Straßenecken findet (sogar noch um 1 Uhr morgens).

Andacht - Die letzten Tacos in Mexiko

Andacht - Die letzten Tacos in Mexiko

Ich werde die gute mexikanische Küche vermissen; besonders Tacos und verschiedene Molesorten. Auch die  Riesenauswahl an Chili werde ich in deutschen Supermärkten leider nicht finden.
Die lockere lateinamerikanische Lebenseinstellung werde ich ebenfalls vermissen.
Aber am meisten vermisse ich die Person die mir in den letzten Monaten ans Herz gewachsen ist. Leider musste ich sie bei meiner Abreise in Mexiko zurücklassen. Um es mit ihren Worten zu sagen: “Das ist nicht gericht!”[sic].

Der “Kulturschock Deutschland” ist weitestgehend ausgeblieben. Ab und an fielen die Unterschiede auf: Die leeren S-Bahnen in den Sommerferien waren natürlich ein Kontrast zu der ständig überfüllten Metro in DF.

Ein anderer Kulturschock in Deutschland waren Fahrradfahrer. Als ich die Kassler Landstr. in Göttingen herunterfuhr, wirbeln an der Abzweigung zum Bahnhof Schwärme von Radfahrern über die Zebrastreifen und Radwege. So viele Radfahrer wie in dem Augenblick habe ich im letzten halben Jahr zusammengerechnet nicht gesehen.

Einen weiteren schönen Schockmoment erfuhr ich in meinem Heimatort als ich nachts auf dem Weg nach Hause war und sich mein Blick ruckartig am Sternenhimmel festsaugte. In meinem Heimatdorf gibt es nachts kaum Lichtverschmutzung, so dass bei geringer oder keiner Bewölkung ein ungetrübter Blick auf den Sternenhimmel möglich ist. Fantastischer Anblick nach sternenlosen Nächten unter dem Neonhorizont von Mexico City!

Außerdem vermisse ich, dass die lateinamerikanischen Popstars die es geschafft haben in Deutschland im Radio zu laufen nicht in spanisch, sondern in englisch singen. *schlotter*

Deutschland hat mich zurück. Einen richtigen Jetlag hatte ich diesmal nicht. Und zu Verabredungen war ich nur in der ersten Woche unpünktlich; wenn man 5-10 Minuten Verspätung überhaut als unpünktlich bezeichnen kann. In Mexiko wären ein paar Minuten nach dem vereinbarten Zeitpunkt überpünktlich.

México lindo y querido. Si muero lejos de ti …

Es steht bereits fest, dass ich wieder nach Mexiko reisen werde.


Mexikanische Geschichte atmen: San Miguel und Dolores

DATUM: Irgendwann in der letzten Juniwoche

La última crusada … die letzte größere Reise in Mexiko ging in den Bundesstaat Guanajuato.
Am Tag meiner Rückkehr aus dem Yucatán-Urlaub nach DF, reiste ich mit Roberta weiter in den Bundesstaat Guanajuato zu Verwandten von ihr (siehe Beitrag zu Celaya).

Die Südhälfte Mexikos war im Würgegriff des Tropensturms Arlene. In DF hat es ebenfalls nur geregnet und im Bundesstaat Guanajuato war der Himmel auch dauerhaft wolkenverhangen mit vereinzelten Wolkenbrüchen.

Wo man hintritt trifft man im Bundesstaat Guanajuato auf mexikanische Geschichte.

San Miguel - Irgendwann in Mexiko

San Miguel - Irgendwann in Mexiko

San Miguel - Kathedrale

San Miguel - Kathedrale

Blick auf San Miguel

Blick auf San Miguel

Wir haben einen Tagesausflug nach San Miguel de Allende und einen Trip nach Dolores Hidalgo unternommen.

Dolores Hidalgo - Statue Statue Miguel

Dolores Hidalgo - Statue Statue Miguel

Wissenswertes über San Miguel lässt sich auf wikipedia nachlesen. Da muss ich gar nicht erst anfangen zu berichten, dass sich in San Miguel 1810 die Armee der Unabhängigkeitskämpfer formte und dass der Beiname San Miguels auf den General Allende zurückgeht. Der Ort selbst wird heutzutage von vielen Künstlern und vielen ausländischen Pensionären bewohnt. San Miguel war desöfteren Kulisse für mexikanische Filme oder für amerikanische Filme die eine typisch mexikanischen Ort brauchten (z.B. Irgendwann in Mexiko). Außerdem ist es als Pueblo Mágico natürlich touristisch – wobei man davon im Regen nicht viel gemerkt hat. War nicht das ideale Ausflugswetter …

Eine weitere Pilgerstätte für Mexikaner ist der verschlafene Ort Dolores. Hier soll der mexikanische Volksheld Miguel Hidalgo seinen Grito de Dolores ausgerufen haben. Der Priester Miguel Hidalgo soll am 16. September 1810 die Kirchenglocke geläutet haben um die Revolutionäre zu versammeln und die Absetzung der spanischen Regierung durchzuführen. Der genaue Wortlaut seines “Unabhängigkeitsrufes” ist nicht überliefert. Die Person Hidalgo ist nicht ganz unstrittig, denn sein Lebensstil war schwer mit dem eines Priesters vereinbar und sein Ruf an die Unabhängigkeit wird hinter vorgehaltener Hand anders gedeutet als in den Geschichtsbüchern steht. Eins gehört nunmal zu vielen Helden und Buhmännern der mexikanischen Geschichte: Tragik

Saludos de Dolores

Saludos de Dolores


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.